VENCLEXTA treatment support

This program is intended to provide product-related education and support to your patients taking VENCLEXTA (venetoclax tablets) for an approved use during the ramp-up phase and throughout their therapy

Image showing how VENCOMPASS logo.  VENCOMPASS Nurses have experience in cancer care and are dedicated to: Helping patients throughout their treatment journey with VENCLEXTA, Communicating with your patients about VENCLEXTA, Informing you when your patients enroll in the program. Patients will be matched with a dedicated VENCOMPASS Nurse.


VENCOMPASS is not intended to replace your medical advice. All information to be provided will be based on full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

Call (844) 9-COMPASS / (844) 926-6727 for more information.
 

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Efficacy

Review study design, overall survival data, remission rates, and more

Safety Data

Review adverse reactions, duration of exposure, and discontinuation rates

Dosing/Management

Review appropriate dosing and management of select adverse reactions

Indication

VENCLEXTA is indicated in combination with azacitidine, or decitabine, or low-dose cytarabine for the treatment of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in adults 75 years or older, or who have comorbidities that preclude use of intensive induction chemotherapy.

Important Safety Information

Tumor Lysis Syndrome

  • Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), including fatal events and renal failure requiring dialysis, has occurred in patients treated with VENCLEXTA.
  • VENCLEXTA can cause rapid reduction in tumor and thus poses a risk for TLS at initiation and during the ramp-up phase in all patients. Changes in blood chemistries consistent with TLS that require prompt management can occur as early as 6 to 8 hours following the first dose of VENCLEXTA and at each dose increase.
  • In patients with AML who followed the current 3-day ramp-up dosing schedule and the TLS prophylaxis and monitoring measures, the rate of TLS was 1.1% in patients who received VENCLEXTA in combination with azacitidine. In patients with AML who followed a 4-day ramp-up dosing schedule and the TLS prophylaxis and monitoring measures, the rate of TLS was 5.6% and included deaths and renal failure in patients who received VENCLEXTA in combination with low-dose cytarabine.
  • The risk of TLS is a continuum based on multiple factors, particularly reduced renal function, tumor burden, and type of malignancy.
  • Assess all patients for risk and provide appropriate prophylaxis for TLS, including hydration and anti-hyperuricemics. Monitor blood chemistries and manage abnormalities promptly. Employ more intensive measures (IV hydration, frequent monitoring, hospitalization) as overall risk increases. Interrupt dosing if needed; when restarting VENCLEXTA follow dose modification guidance in the Prescribing Information.
  • Concomitant use of VENCLEXTA with P-gp inhibitors or strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitors increases venetoclax exposure, which may increase the risk of TLS at initiation and during the ramp-up phase, and requires VENCLEXTA dose reduction.

Neutropenia

  • In patients with AML, baseline neutrophil counts worsened in 95% to 100% of patients treated with VENCLEXTA in combination with azacitidine or decitabine or low-dose cytarabine. Neutropenia can recur with subsequent cycles.
  • Monitor complete blood counts. Interrupt dosing for severe neutropenia. Resume at same dose then reduce duration based on remission status and first or subsequent occurrence of neutropenia. Consider supportive measures including antimicrobials and growth factors (e.g., G-CSF).

Infections

  • Fatal and serious infections such as pneumonia and sepsis have occurred in patients treated with VENCLEXTA. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of infection and treat promptly. Withhold VENCLEXTA for Grade 3 and 4 infection until resolution and resume at same dose.

Immunization

  • Do not administer live attenuated vaccines prior to, during, or after treatment with VENCLEXTA until B-cell recovery occurs. Advise patients that vaccinations may be less effective. 

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

  • VENCLEXTA may cause embryo-fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with VENCLEXTA and for at least 30 days after the last dose.

Increased Mortality in Patients with Multiple Myeloma when VENCLEXTA is Added to Bortezomib and Dexamethasone

  • In a randomized trial (BELLINI; NCT02755597) in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, the addition of VENCLEXTA to bortezomib plus dexamethasone, a use for which VENCLEXTA is not indicated, resulted in increased mortality. Treatment of patients with multiple myeloma with VENCLEXTA in combination with bortezomib plus dexamethasone is not recommended outside of controlled clinical trials. 

Adverse Reactions

  • In patients with AML receiving combination therapy with azacitidine, the most frequent serious adverse reactions (≥5%) were febrile neutropenia (30%), pneumonia (22%), sepsis (excluding fungal; 19%), and hemorrhage (6%). The most common adverse reactions including hematological abnormalities (≥30%) of any grade were neutrophils decreased (98%), platelets decreased (94%), lymphocytes decreased (91%), hemoglobin decreased (61%), nausea (44%), diarrhea (43%), febrile neutropenia (42%), musculoskeletal pain (36%), pneumonia (33%), fatigue (31%), and vomiting (30%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 23% of patients who received VENCLEXTA in combination with azacitidine, with the most frequent (≥2%) being pneumonia (4%), sepsis (excluding fungal; 3%), and hemorrhage (2%).
  • In patients with AML receiving combination therapy with decitabine, the most frequent serious adverse reactions (≥10%) were sepsis (excluding fungal; 46%), febrile neutropenia (38%), and pneumonia (31%). The most common adverse reactions including hematological abnormalities (≥30%) of any grade were neutrophils decreased (100%), lymphocytes decreased (100%), white blood cells decreased (100%), platelets decreased (92%), hemoglobin decreased (69%), febrile neutropenia (69%), fatigue (62%), constipation (62%), musculoskeletal pain (54%), dizziness (54%), nausea (54%), abdominal pain (46%), diarrhea (46%), pneumonia (46%), sepsis (excluding fungal; 46%), cough (38%), pyrexia (31%), hypotension (31%), oropharyngeal pain (31%), edema (31%), and vomiting (31%). One (8%) fatal adverse reaction of bacteremia occurred within 30 days of starting treatment.
  • In patients with AML receiving combination therapy with low-dose cytarabine, the most frequent serious adverse reactions (≥10%) were pneumonia (17%), febrile neutropenia (16%), and sepsis (excluding fungal; 12%). The most common adverse reactions including hematological abnormalities (≥30%) of any grade were platelets decreased (97%), neutrophils decreased (95%), lymphocytes decreased (92%), hemoglobin decreased (63%), nausea (42%), and febrile neutropenia (32%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 23% of patients who received VENCLEXTA in combination with LDAC, with the most frequent (≥5%) being pneumonia (6%) and sepsis (excluding fungal; 7%).

Drug Interactions

  • Concomitant use with a P-gp inhibitor or a strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitor increases VENCLEXTA exposure, which may increase VENCLEXTA toxicities, including the risk of TLS. Consider alternative medications or adjust VENCLEXTA dosage and monitor more frequently for adverse reactions. Resume the VENCLEXTA dosage that was used prior to concomitant use of a P-gp inhibitor or a strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitor 2 to 3 days after discontinuation of the inhibitor.
  • Patients should avoid grapefruit products, Seville oranges, and starfruit during treatment as they contain inhibitors of CYP3A. 
  • Avoid concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A inducers.  
  • Monitor international normalized ratio (INR) more frequently in patients receiving warfarin.
  • Avoid concomitant use of VENCLEXTA with a P-gp substrate. If concomitant use is unavoidable, separate dosing of the P-gp substrate at least 6 hours before VENCLEXTA. 

Lactation

  • Advise nursing women not to breastfeed during treatment with VENCLEXTA and for 1 week after the last dose.

Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

  • Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with VENCLEXTA and for at least 30 days after the last dose.
  • Based on findings in animals, VENCLEXTA may impair male fertility.

Hepatic Impairment 

  • Reduce the dose of VENCLEXTA for patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh C); monitor these patients more frequently for signs of adverse reactions. No dose adjustment is recommended for patients with mild (Child-Pugh A) or moderate (Child-Pugh B) hepatic impairment.

Please see full Prescribing Information.

VENCLEXTA®, VENCOMPASS® and their designs are registered trademarks of AbbVie Inc.

    • VENCLEXTA Prescribing Information.

      VENCLEXTA Prescribing Information.

    • Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Acute Myeloid Leukemia V.3.2021. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Accessed March 2, 2021. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.

      Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Acute Myeloid Leukemia V.3.2021. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Accessed March 2, 2021. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.

    • DiNardo CD, Jonas BA, Pullarkat V, et al. Azacitidine and venetoclax in previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia. N Engl J Med. 2020;383(7):617-629.

      DiNardo CD, Jonas BA, Pullarkat V, et al. Azacitidine and venetoclax in previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia. N Engl J Med. 2020;383(7):617-629.

    • Data on file, AbbVie Inc. ABVRRTI71211.

      Data on file, AbbVie Inc. ABVRRTI71211.

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      Data on file, AbbVie Inc. ABVRRTI71272.

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      Data on file, AbbVie Inc. ABVRRTI67697.

    • Data on file, AbbVie Inc. ABVRRTI71500.

      Data on file, AbbVie Inc. ABVRRTI71500.

    • CRESEMBA Prescribing Information.

      CRESEMBA Prescribing Information.

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      Drug development and drug interactions: table of substrates, inhibitors and inducers. US Food and Drug Administration website. https://www.fda.gov/drugs/developmentapprovalprocess/developmentresources/druginteractionslabeling/ucm093664.htm. Updated March 6, 2020. Accessed October 15, 2020.

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